An analysis of martin luther king jrs message in letter from birmingham jail

While confined here in the Birmingham city jail, I came across your recent statement calling my present activities "unwise and untimely. If I sought to answer all the criticisms that cross my desk, my secretaries would have little time for anything other than such correspondence in the course of the day, and I would have no time for constructive work. But since I feel that you are men of genuine good will and that your criticisms are sincerely set forth, I want to try to answer your statement in what I hope will be patient and reasonable terms.

An analysis of martin luther king jrs message in letter from birmingham jail

His comparison would seem to indicate that he shares an affinity with them. However, the clarity with which he makes his arguments and the dedication to a single premise strikes most strongly of Kant. Despite this singularity of purpose, the complexity of the situation meant that a more nuanced response to the statement A Call for Unity as published by eight Alabama Clergymen was necessary.

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In Martin Luther King Jr. He is telling them that he has credibility on the matter of injustice, not because he is the recipient of white privilege, but because he is well researched on the subject.

We have some eighty-five affiliated organizations across the South, and one of them is the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights. Frequently, we share staff, educational, and financial resources with our affiliates. He is proving to them that he contains just as much intellect on the subject of injustice and racial discrimination, if not more.

Martin Luther King Jr. It is really an emotional paragraph, and using this emotion at the beginning of his letter captures the attention of his audience.

This is exactly what King wanted in order to make the audience feel the strong emotion and pain he felt, and persuade you to keep reading the letter to hear what he has to say about these outrage of acts, show you positive ways to change them, and justify his cause of writing this letter in response to the clergymen.

Martin Luther King then proceeds to justify his cause for protest and establishes reasons for the advancement of civil rights. Even so, I am sure that, had I lived in Germany at the time, I would have aided and comforted my Jewish brothers. It is assumed that as good Christians, they would have given aid to any person in need.

He draws a correlation to the atrocities committed against the Jews to the atrocities committed against African Americans in America — though on a much smaller scale, the situations can be considered similar, with unjust laws bringing about violence and deaths.

An analysis of martin luther king jrs message in letter from birmingham jail

King forces the clergymen to think about the morally correct course of action. King again uses pathos in order to appeal to the human emotions so as to incite the clergymen and citizens alike to take action and end the oppressive burden of racism and hate. Here, King conveys a sense of panic and urgency to the audience by suggesting that the once almighty Church could falter without changes in spirit and behavior by people.

Another effective way King appeals to pathos while emphasising the need for urgency is by bringing his audience into the letter by the use of second person.

In the letter King gives his opinion on the praise that some were giving the Birmingham police force by directly addressing them with what he saw in the situation. He uses his personal experiences from his situation to back up his argument and show the brutality of the police force.

The overall tone of the last section is very emotional and he urges the readers of the letter to adopt the same sense of concern. By using religious examples which appeal directly to his audience, the preachers, he attempts to gain their support and legitimize his course of action.

King also alludes to the examples from many philosophers and saints, including Socrates and Aquinus. The overall urgency and call for action in the letter is emphasised by his strong appeals to pathos.

His imagery, personal experiences, and appeals to ethos and logos throughout make a strong, well rounded argument. He effectively demonstrates the impact of the trials the African American people have gone through and proves that what they are fighting for is a just cause on both legal and moral grounds.

By inspiring sympathy through strong emotional appeals, King brings hope for positive change — that the white clergymen reading his letter will begin to understand the overlying problem and work for change. That is the ultimate goal — to bring about a better world for those under persecution and create an equal, just future for America as a whole.Letter from the Birmingham Jail Quotes Showing of 25 “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.

We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. King’s letter from the Birmingham jail inspired a national civil rights movement.

The goal was to completely end the system of segregation in every aspect of public life (stores, separate bathrooms and drinking fountains, etc.) and in job discrimination.

Analysis of the Letter from Birmingham Jail Written by Martin Luther King Jr., the “Letter from Birmingham Jail” is a paragon of persuasive writing that takes advantage of ethos, pathos, and logos in order to convince its readers to take MLK’s side during the American civil rights movement.

Martin Luther King, Jr. takes on and beats nine tough criticisms in his 'Letter from Birmingham Jail.' Discover the hidden structure and radical rhetorical power of Dr.

Martin Luther King, Jr.'s. Letter From Birmingham Jail study guide contains a biography of Martin Luther King, Jr., literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

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An analysis of martin luther king jrs message in letter from birmingham jail

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Letter from the Birmingham Jail Quotes by Martin Luther King Jr.